Chris R's Weblog

Daily link October 27th, 2007

This man, Rory, used to work at Microsoft

He worked 4 hours per day, then decided it was too grueling and quit.

Today he muses about places in France where naked women dance. But can not come to the realization that there are plenty of them. Not only in France but in the US, Canada, especially Mexico and all other countries, except for maybe communist China.

Why am I blogging about Rory, a former Microsoft employee? Because he was the best and the brightest Microsoft had to offer. Listen to his post-retirement clip and resume from his other website.

This is what Microsoft has to offer it’s shareholders and it’s customers. Lots and lots of people like Rory. Until they quit from all that stress that is. This is part of why I recommend open technologies as a superior solution. Open source doesn’t boast a whole lot of employees like him. I’m not judging him here or making any kind of comment about his professionalism or lack thereof. I am just saying, look, listen and judge for yourself. I am trying to be as fair as possible, all the while informing people that read this blog.

I have no hard feelings against Rory. I hope he finds his hole in the wall. I wish him well.

UPDATE: I just saw this on digg, and I thought I could throw it into the pot pourri: Ten Absolutely Stupid Quotes By Steve Ballmer

43 Comments »

  1. […] Check it out! While looking through the blogosphere we stumbled on an interesting post today.Here’s a quick excerptThis is what Microsoft has to offer it’s shareholders and it’s customers. Lots and lots of people like Rory. Until they quit from all that stress that is. This is part of why I recommend Open Technologies as a superior solution. … […]

    Comment by Ghillie Suits » This man, Rory, used to work at Microsoft — October 27th, 2007 @ 1:20 pm
  2. […] Check it out! While looking through the blogosphere we stumbled on an interesting post today.Here’s a quick excerpt […]

    Comment by My Ghillie » This man, Rory, used to work at Microsoft — October 27th, 2007 @ 1:22 pm
  3. Oh, how I’ve missed you.

    Yes. I was working four hours a day, but it wasn’t especially difficult. I was on partial medical leave from my nervous breakdown (as you know - and I thank you for your compassion), and I received nothing but great support from Jeff and all my coworkers despite my having become more of a burden than a benefit to the team.

    I had the option - and was urged to take it by the benefits team - to go on full leave at 75% pay with all benefits for six to twelve months, depending on whether things improved.

    I chose not to take that time. I only took the partial leave because I wanted to find out, post-breakdown, if I still wanted a corporate job or not. Not just at Microsoft, but anywhere. I’ve proved myself versatile, having done everything from independent work to public speaking, leading efforts in broad reach, and, as you know, conducting interviews for Channel 9. There weren’t many options closed to me, and I continue to receive job offers based on my track record. However, what the people offering me jobs don’t seem to know is that I have absolutely *zero* interest in returning to the industry. Working for myself, you, or anyone else. I’m writing now, and I’m happy. I wake up when I want to, have coffee when I want to, am free to stay out all hours of the night until I’m satisfied with my social interactions, and then crash at home, falling asleep to an episode of Dr Who or whatever seems nice.

    It’s great. Seriously. You could use some of this rather than litigating and nurturing your anger.

    Anyway, I didn’t take the full leave because:

    1. Since I’d technically still have my job, Jeff couldn’t have opened up another head to fill my position while I was gone. This would have left Charles and the rest of the team to do my work for me, and that’s not right. These people are friends of mine, and I’d never do that to them. I’d rather live off my savings and break my connection with Microsoft than make money while making the lives of my coworkers worse. I’ve done well, and I can afford to do this - it’s a matter of integrity; not money.

    2. I already knew after a couple weeks of partial leave that I wasn’t going to stay. It would have been dishonest to have remained on full leave. Whatever anybody may think, I’m honest. I’m don’t take advantage of people. I won’t even take advantage of an industry (this includes *all* tech I’ve encountered - MS, OSS, etc.) that’s splintered, distracted easily by silly political battles, and rife with inefficiency. It’s sad, but when I was an independent, it was trivially easy to find work that consisted of nothing more than fixing other people’s mistakes. And, for the record, I worked with MS (Windows, SQL Server, etc.), Oracle, AS/400 (now iSeries), various unixes (-xes is the preferred spelling according to current grammarians), various flavors of linux, Java, Python, Perl, ASP, ASP.Net, JSP, servlets, Websphere, IIS, Apache, and so on. I’ve only rarely turned down dev contracts because I felt I wasn’t up to the task (that goes back to honesty - I don’t cheat people - if I can’t do it properly, then I won’t, unless it’s for my own education or amusement - this is *not* standard in the industry - again, I practically lived, saved, and vacationed entirely by cleaning up the messes of other devs).

    Whatever money I’ve made, I’ve earned, and I don’t appreciate having my value called into question. I realize that you assert that this post isn’t about me, you’ve commented negatively on my ability to perform job duties. That’s a lawsuit right there. It’s called libel, and if I weren’t so happy about having people like you out of my life (for the most part), I’d pick up a phone, make some appointment, and waste days, weeks, and perhaps months of my life to make a point that won’t even matter in the long run. Based on the responses you get here (I see spam, and I’d recommend, from one web guy to another, that you delete it - to leave it is tacky - I believe it also violates your TOS, thought I didn’t read your TOS in full because the box in which you’ve presented them is tiny, and the terms themselves are tedious), I don’t think I’m in danger of losing business from what you’ve said, though I’ll keep it in mind.

    I don’t see why working on OSS projects should somehow change the quality of the devs working on them. I’ve seen so much horrible, uncommented, crufty code - in commercial, proprietary, open source work - that it’s clear to me there isn’t a place on Earth where you’re going to find a greater caliber of person, regardless of the model you follow.

    The dev industry is especially difficult because coding is a craft. It’s not an art, nor is it a science - it’s much closer to basket weaving than it is rocket science. Perl is a great example - “There’s more than one way to do it” - I can think of no better way to express the mess that is coding, and only experience combined with some intelligence and knowledge will give you what it takes to truly excel at development. But, most devs aren’t that person. Like basket weaving, the quality of the thing is going to be far easier to judge in the long run. Unless you’re highly skilled, you won’t be able to look at a project, or a basket (or whatever other craft-based metaphor pleases you) and be able to guess at its durability. If it’s still around in five, ten, fifteen years, and so on, and if it’s reasonably easy to maintain it, then it’s probably well done.

    But few of the largest projects are that super-basket. Windows is crufty. Linux is crufty. Both are just a mess. We can compare them and discuss which is cruftier and where, but it won’t change the fact that *both* are crufy.

    What I could have said in fewer words, but without the benefit of an explanation of what I mean, is that I’m interested in hearing about why you think OSS is somehow idiot-resistant. You didn’t use the phrase “idiot-resistant” - that’s mine - but it’s a decent summation of how you appear to believe OSS is protected. If you have a phrase that is better suited to your thoughts, then, by all means, use it. I’ve only offered my own because your argument is presented without substantial clarification. You might know what you mean with a couple sentences, but I don’t, and even though I suspect I’m not your target demographic, I’d still appreciate elaboration provided you can find it in your kind and charitable nature to educate me on the matter.

    Moving on, I thank you for recognizing me as “the best and brightest Microsoft had to offer.” In a company of around 70,000 (that number changes frequently), it’s a great honor to have been given this compliment.

    Speaking of which, “the best and brightest Microsoft had to offer” wanted to let you know that, when you wrote this:

    “This is what Microsoft has to offer it’s shareholders and it’s customers.”

    You meant this:

    “This is what Microsoft has to offer its shareholders and its customers.”

    It puzzles me why being able to tell the difference between “its” (third person impersonal possessive pronoun) and “it’s” (contraction of “it” and “is”), a skill that everybody ought to have picked up around the age of nine or ten, is a problem for so many adults. I don’t blame you, by the by; I’d point the finger at your education and how it failed you.

    Otherwise, I agree. If I, as “the best and brightest Microsoft had to offer,” “[was] what Microsoft [had] to offer it’s [sic] shareholders and it’s [sic] customers,” then we are in agreement.

    When a former MS employee can jump from an influential post about the industry (I think you remember Fake Steve Jobs’s post in which he praised me to an extend that was almost embarrassing - you did, after all, comment on it) to a fun bit of writing on a childhood song meant to cause a few people to chuckle over the weekend (and, by “a few people,” I’m referring to whoever it is that’s responsible for the roughly 700,000 page views (not hits, but actual page views) my *personal* site gets each month), then I think it’s a compliment of the highest order, highlighting my creativity, versatility, ability to connect with people over one of the most impersonal media I know (that’d be the net), and I thank you for it from the tippy top of my head to the fancy shoes beneath me.

    That’s about it. Hope you have a nice weekend.

    And, if you’d like to try to hire me again, I’d like to remind you that I’m happy where I am. I nearly have my first book assembled, and I’m optimistic about breaking in to an industry about which I know next to nothing, though the job should be made fairly easy thanks to the editors and writers who have been contacting me, offering to hook me up with agents who would like what I do.

    It pays to be professional, nice, a bit off the wall, and to have integrity.

    Now we wait to see if you’ll allow this comment through, or allow it to remain, or, should you allow it to remain, to allow it to remain unedited.

    Curiosity abounds.

    Comment by Rory — October 27th, 2007 @ 5:58 pm
  4. “Now we wait to see if you’ll allow this comment through, or allow it to remain, or, should you allow it to remain, to allow it to remain unedited.”

    Of course. I don’t censor. I believe in free speech.

    “you’ve commented negatively on my ability to perform job duties. That’s a lawsuit right there. “

    It’s odd that you say you’d like your employer to provide you with a meth stand in your resume, yet you are worried about my stating that you left Microsoft after having to work only 4 hours per day? Perhaps you should be more worried about mentioning a meth addiction in your resume?

    “And, if you’d like to try to hire me again”

    I don’t think you’d be a good fit here, and I doubt you would sell any software. I also don’t like the fact that you want to take your new employer down “all at once”. I prefer the steady burn?

    At any rate, Rory Blyth, good luck with your new life. Look at the wonders it did for Robert Scoble when he took off from Microsoft Channel 9 slash MSDN, slash Microsoft evangelism team.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 27th, 2007 @ 6:41 pm
  5. “Of course. I don’t censor.”

    Of course. You only get upset when other people won’t censor you on their sites after you’ve made a fool of yourself.

    Not that censorship would matter too much here. Either way, you and I are the only people who will ever read this exchange.

    “It’s odd that you say you’d like your employer to provide you with a meth stand in your resume”

    The popular podcast, of which a reading of my fake resume is a part, is clearly for entertainment. Unless Canada is somehow different when it comes to free speech, you don’t have to declare your humorous intent in the United States. Unless you’re severely out of touch with reality (clearly unable, for example, to tell a fictional resume from a real one), the context is enough to establish that I’m just having fun. Terrible example, Mr. Rondat.

    I demanded a heliport in that same resume, and I can’t imagine a single fairly intelligent person who wouldn’t recognize that as humor by exaggeration, though if you don’t see it that way, then I take it you think I’m important enough that a request for a heliport is reasonable. For that, I thank you, though I didn’t really want one.

    “I don’t think you’d be a good fit here, and I doubt you would sell any software.”

    That’s odd… only several weeks ago, you tried to hire me (or at least contract my services) for a sales position with your “company”. I turned it down (by not responding, per your stated preference that I should only respond if I wanted to accept, but that I should otherwise hold my tongue). I guess I had determined long before you had (going back nearly a year when you first tried to hire me) that I wasn’t “a good fit” at your “company”.

    “I also don’t like the fact that you want to take your new employer down “all at once”. I prefer the steady burn?”

    I can see, then, how I might be redundant at BeerCo. I think you already have enough people (person?) working on going from a de facto non-profit to… well… nothing.

    And thanks for all the links. I don’t particularly need them, especially where my google rank won’t be improved, but it’s a nice gesture. I want more people to read my stuff, too. ‘Course, we run into the same issue I’ve already mentioned, and that’s the dearth of readers around here. You can’t refer people to my site if the people aren’t here.

    But again, I appreciate the effort.

    Comment by Rory — October 27th, 2007 @ 8:03 pm
  6. http://www.alexa.com/data/details/traffic_details?url=neopoleon.com

    1 wk. Avg. 708,323

    http://www.alexa.com/data/details/traffic_details?url=beercosoftware.com

    1 wk. Avg. 204,607

    Those are averages for this past week. This blog is getting to be extremely popular.

    For those of you that do not know, Rory has a mental illness. He is bipolar, he has stated this on his blog several times, so it’s not a new piece of information I am revealing.

    Rory, I honestly did not know that the resume was a joke. With some of the wild things you have said in the past, I thought you were being serious. It is really hard to tell with you. One could actually infer that some of the wild things you say and do could be attributed to something like meth abuse, including the resume itself. The part about the feces was re-iterated from a serious introductory video interview you did with Charles Torre. So you are mixing and matching fantasy with reality to a point which would confuse anyone.

    “Either way, you and I are the only people who will ever read this exchange.”

    Tens of thousands of people read this blog last month metered by Google analytics. People are lurkers in general. Sorry you didn’t pick up on that at C9.

    “That’s odd… only several weeks ago, you tried to hire me (or at least contract my services) for a sales position with your “company””

    I wanted you to downsell our services to those people you knew were overpaying on MS partner 3rd tier support. Nothing more. I don’t think you have access to that anymore. You may have been able to right after you left, like that week, but I doubt it would work now. Now you’re just unemployed in Seattle. If I really wanted somebody who is generic and unemployed in Seattle I have about a million candidates to choose from.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 27th, 2007 @ 9:22 pm
  7. “Those are averages for this past week. This blog is getting to be extremely popular.”

    I figured you’d go to Alexa. The numbers are rubbish. The metrics are interesting - I won’t contest that - but I moved my feeds to FeedBurner a while ago, and traffic dropped off (obviously). My traffic has, traditionally, been roughly 50/50 between browser and RSS. When my RSS feeds went away (with a permanent redirect as well), so did those stats.

    As I said, it’s still interesting, but I also don’t trust it. Given the opt-in nature of the thing, the geek-oriented nature of the thing, the lack of any reliable demographic reporting, I’ve never seen Alexa as anything more than a nifty toy.

    “For those of you that do not know, Rory has a mental illness. He is bipolar, he has stated this on his blog several times, so it’s not a new piece of information I am revealing.”

    I don’t think anybody’s accusing you of outing my bipolar condition (specifically, Bipolar Disorder II - that’s the one with hypomania rather than mania - also, I’ve traditionally lingered in the severely-depressed end of things rather than the hypomanic state (assuming anybody’s interested in the details, as bipolar conditions are poorly understood by people who’ve been raised with the common “manic depression” 50s era understanding)).

    I’ve talked about my mental problems for years. Nothing new there. But I rarely interact with people who allow that to influence them at all, except that they tend to pay more attention to problems such as my depression more than they would other people - and mostly just to be there to help when things go wrong.

    However, with 200mg/day of Lamictal and 900mg/day of lithium (the lithium is taken as-needed), I’ve completely stabilized. It was actually this leveling out and clarity of thought that *really* drove home the idea that I should leave Microsoft and the industry. The fun, the amazing experiences (public speaking, etc. - things I learned to do and love while at MS), and the money aren’t worth watching your life disappear, hour after hour, when you know (and I mean “when *I* know) that there are things I’d much rather be doing with my time.

    Point being, aside from my mental problems having already been well established publicly, hey had nothing to do with my leaving the industry, except insofar as they led to better treatment followed by recovery followed by figuring out what I truly wanted out of life. When I left Microsoft, I was feeling the best I’d felt in years - since about 1997, actually.

    “Rory, I honestly did not know that the resume was a joke.”

    Then know that you’re in the minority. I get a lot of fan mail about the podcast - even from the iTunes podcast team (who also advertised the show in a big ass “brick” they made for me, placed prominently on the home page for podcasts). These people have never even hinted at thinking the resume wasn’t a joke.

    I stop short of saying that the joke wasn’t received simply because someone was lacking the basic mental plumbing to be able to connect the dots to see the humor in it, but that does certainly account for some of the cases of people “not getting it.”

    I’ve noticed that you have a strong fixation on alcohol. Surely you know that alcohol, along with some of its metabolites, is a potent neurotoxin. If you’re interested, I could hook you up with some studies showing rather definitely the link between alcohol consumption and damage to the prefrontal cortex, resulting in increasing difficulty throughout life to be able to see the connection between a joke and its punchline (and humor in general where things get a bit wacky).

    Incidentally, with the exception of my *rare* indulgences in alcohol, I’ve never done a drug that does brain damage.

    Connect the dots.

    It’s sad, and as I’ve watched as friends and family have been affected by alcohol in this way, I’ve avoided telling them about the extent to which alcohol destroys the mind. Since you can’t go back and fix it, there’s almost no point in mentioning it, though it slips out from time to time, as I hope to at least catch them before they do themselves any further damage.

    “Tens of thousands of people read this blog last month metered by Google analytics. People are lurkers in general.”

    Having always had the kind of charisma that encourages people to get involved, I’ve observed the lurking quality many possess, but I’ve met so many people, spoken to so many people, delivered content to so many people, and had so many responses that it’s easy to forget there are still lurkers about.

    I find that people are far more likely to speak up if they feel included - the usual boring, angry, accusatory, worthless spew that is the commonest mode of communication in the world of blogs only turns people away, or attracts other boring, angry, accusatory, worthless types.

    While we all get numbers, I measure the *quality* by comments. It’s only when people feel moved to respond that I feel I’ve achieved anything of importance.

    Fortunately, it happens all the time, so I often feel I’ve achieved something of importance.

    “I wanted you to downsell our services to those people you knew were overpaying on MS partner 3rd tier support.”

    When it comes to assumptions from ignorance that could have been addressed simply by asking, you’re the king.

    I have no idea how much the support contracts are. I didn’t deal with them, and never did. Yeah, support contracts are important to the company, but my duties were so far outside anything to do with those contracts that I never, ever had to know *anything* about them to perform my duties.

    Using your logic - that someone should know about something completely unrelated to his position - do you do a lot of the toilet scrubbing for the BeerCo bathroom?

    “I don’t think you have access to that anymore. You may have been able to right after you left, like that week, but I doubt it would work now.”

    Brilliant. It’s been just about four weeks, I’m still getting contacted by softies, and I’m still receiving job offers.

    Connections don’t disappear over three weeks. At least not for those of us who, despite fun public antics, actually conduct their professional lives professionally.

    I took a hiatus from tech work from late 2003 until early 2004 (maybe four months or so) to go hang out with my friends (the people who truly matter in life), and the connections ever dried up. I regularly turned away work, and didn’t accept anything until Carl offered me the co-hosting position for .NET Rocks. That opportunity sounded like a lot of fun, so I took it. But I didn’t fully return to the industry until late July (August, basically) of that year, and I still got to pick and choose what I wanted.

    It perplexes me how badly you seem to want to see me fall. I don’t know if you get it or not, but I have:

    1. Money
    2. A strong network
    3. Connections in other industries should I ever need them

    I may have had a hard time in the past with emotional stability, but that’s gone now, and I just don’t see myself failing, though you can keep your eyes peeled. If I go down in a big way, I hope you’re there to enjoy it.

    All the same, I’ve never lost out on a big risk, and I’ve taken many. The risk is the most exciting part anyway.

    Speaking of losing, how did your little court case turn out? And do I need to be more specific about which court case? I know how much you love to clog up the courts with silly lawsuits.

    “Now you’re just unemployed in Seattle.”

    I’m unemployed and in *Portland*. Very different. The parties here are much better, and so’s the traffic. These differences are important.

    “If I really wanted somebody who is generic and unemployed in Seattle I have about a million candidates to choose from.”

    And I wouldn’t be one of them.

    Comment by Rory — October 27th, 2007 @ 10:40 pm
  8. “I’ve noticed that you have a strong fixation on alcohol. “

    I’m drinking it right now buddy. It’s after work hours.

    “Using your logic - that someone should know about something completely unrelated to his position - do you do a lot of the toilet scrubbing for the BeerCo bathroom?”

    Our building is managed. The building owners have to pay people to do that stuff. We just write software.

    ##################

    You may not have noticed all the servers on the photoblog link on the right side of this page, but we’re releasing a small part of a search engine soon, in a month or 2, with a full 8B page index by next summer. I’m not looking very hard for contract sales people anymore. I’m still looking, just not very hard.

    Our business will shift to selling keywords where we provide long term support for our existing contract customers. Keyword sales do not require sales people. Keyword sales hardly require support, and keyword sales on searches are what we want for our future.

    “And I wouldn’t be one of them.”

    I guess not. You’re one in a million.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 27th, 2007 @ 11:10 pm
  9. Well, it was real. I’m off to bed now. At any rate, all past 48h searches will be precompiled and stored in a HUGE ramdisk array containing the DB and hash. The results will be lighting fast and will not show anything past 10 result pages so the DB can not be ripped by automation. Same as Google.

    All mirror servers will have the same config. The search hits will never hit the hard disks, everything precompiled in a RAM filesystem. The web index store backend will not even be attached and will feed the mirrors by scheduled update.

    It takes so many engineers, bla, bla, bla yet Larry and Sergey did it in a single garage. It’s not that hard. Pretty hard, not that hard.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 28th, 2007 @ 12:13 am
  10. “do I need to be more specific about which court case? I know how much you love to clog up the courts with silly lawsuits.”

    Microsoft told the court that they never received my takedown notices. The judgment said that since I did not produce proof that they received them, that they couldn’t rule in my favor. None of the take downs I sent MS legal, Scoble when he was working there, or Torre EVER BOUNCED. NEVER. They received those and read them the same day. I had registered mail receipts from Canada post but didn’t bring them. MS legal received the takedown notices in a timely manner. THEY LIED. Had I brought my registered mail receipts it would have been different. I didn’t think it would matter because I didn’t think they would deny it. Also, in a small claims case, you can not ask for a recess to go get more evidence. I didn’t even have a chance to go rummage for the registered mail receipt. Next time, I’ll do a better job preparing, and I will use email sent receipts. I know they got and read the takedowns via email. It was bullshit.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 28th, 2007 @ 9:25 am
  11. They even took down the deep link, but they did it like 5 months later when it didn’t matter any more. They willfully caused BeerCo severe monetary damages, and they got away with it on a stupid technicality. They won’t next time.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 28th, 2007 @ 9:26 am
  12. “None of the take downs I sent MS legal, Scoble when he was working there, or Torre EVER BOUNCED. NEVER.”

    I’d love to provide you with my sympathy, but you got what you deserved.

    Using me, along with a digest of our non-MS related communications, our communications totally unrelated to your complaint, and trying to make your case by lying about my involvement, I can’t think of a reason to support you in any way.

    According to the information and documents you shared with me (when you were puffing up your chest about how much damage you were going to do in court, and how you had practically won the case already - Ha ha - oh, that’s lovely), you said that MS was [insert rude adjective here] to have put *me*, and people *like* me (who else at 9 is like *me* in the ways you put down? insanity, blah blah blah) *in charge* of Channel 9.

    I created content, and that was the full extent of my duties. I was *never* in charge of 9. I had a key role, but I never made top down decisions. My position was that of an “Individual Contributor” in Microsoft parlance, and that means “Someone who isn’t in charge of anything.”

    You can argue that you didn’t know, but that’s the only reasonable argument you can make, and that one would be bull**** anyway. If you want to make as bold an assertion as you did, and if you want to do what’s right, then you *must* do your fact checking. That bit of information alone would have been enough to discredit you. Who wants to read page after page of emails - again, mostly, of not totally, unrelated to your case except insofar as I worked for the company you sued - when, after one assertion is put straight, every other bit of correspondence could be just as false?

    I was hanging out with some friends last night, and told them about you, the way you’ve harassed me for months without cause, and how you appear to be continuing this childish behavior. After reading your post and listening to my account of our interactions over the year (obviously with a bias - it would be impossible for me to recount events without that bias, and I’ll freely admit to that), they weren’t amused. To the contrary, they thought I ought to stop communicating with you on account of apparent mental defects (specifically, yours).

    I agree somewhat with their opinions, but I also have little interest in letting someone like you - someone who seems to be motivated by malice, petty anger, and outright delusional thinking (you’re building a search engine - the market is flooded, and you won’t make any headway - I’m not being an asshole here - just telling it like it is) - continue to libel me. It isn’t even the legality of the thing that bothers me - it’s that I’ve never before encountered someone who expended so much energy on the pointless task of trying to damage my reputation or question my ability to perform a job. I don’t know what your deal is, and I’m surprised I haven’t asked this sooner:

    Why me? What did I do to you? More to the point, why did you start harassing me (or whatever term you’d feel comfortable with) without provocation back when I joined 9?

    I want to understand. I get caught up in these arguments, as you really have been offensive for no reason I can ascertain, but I’ll take a break for the moment to give you the chance to explain.

    To repeat:

    Why me? What did I do to you? More to the point, why did you start harassing me (or whatever term you’d feel comfortable with) without provocation back when I joined 9?

    This should be interesting.

    Comment by Rory — October 28th, 2007 @ 6:53 pm
  13. “Why me? What did I do to you? More to the point, why did you start harassing me (or whatever term you’d feel comfortable with) without provocation back when I joined 9?”

    I had only commented on one of your posts, then before I knew it you were offering to fly me at your own expense to Redmond in order to mock me in front of your camcorder and your buddies at Microsoft. That’s pretty low.

    Then when I politely asked you if you wanted to sell contracts, you said yes, then you told me to write you up a contract so you could sign it with certain conditions. I did so then you told me you lied. You did all this being extremely rude.

    I only responded to your your many emails to me because you kept eluding to your capabilities as being able to perform tasks for our company. You mislead me about that as well.

    I sent you very polite responses to your many rude and impolite rants. I drew up a contract when you asked me for it, and I gave you reasonable conditions under which I would do your Microsoft interview whilst keeping my own rights in tact.

    In this blog post, I simply put up links to the media that you created, and stated that you worked 4 hours per day and quit because you could no longer handle it. I also told people to listen and decide for themselves.

    In my case, I stated that Microsoft was irresponsible to have such actions carried out on their behalves. That’s all. That’s unrelated to my answer about the case. You brought it up for god knows what reason.

    Comment by Chris — October 28th, 2007 @ 7:54 pm
  14. “when you were puffing up your chest about how much damage you were going to do in court”

    I wasn’t able to call witnesses. Otherwise I would have had Scoble, and Charles subpoenaed, then I would have asked them when they read the takedown notice, and why they did not comply with it. I think their answer would have changed the outcome.

    There are certain limits on this type of trial. Like I said I was not able to recess and go get my registered mail receipt, and there is also no appeal available. My only option for justice would be to refile in the USA, and I don’t think the cost of the litigation would justify it, even if I won. The judge here had very little information to make a decision. It would be like if you had 2 pieces of a jigsaw puzzle but had to figure out what the whole picture was. There simply wasn’t enough resources in the small claims format for the picture to be completed.

    Comment by Chris — October 28th, 2007 @ 8:31 pm
  15. Oh, and did I censor what you wrote Rory?
    No, I think most people are intelligent enough to consider the source.

    Comment by Chris — October 28th, 2007 @ 8:33 pm
  16. I’m writing up a proper response to the few comments above, but given how much you like to point out things I’ve said that you consider inappropriate, I wonder how you’d explain to your customers what you were doing posting a link to SiteSpaces to a story about “an infant” getting “sodomized” by a dog:

    http://www.sitespaces.net/thefeed.php?userposts&1&4

    Anyway, yeah - I’ll be back in a little while. I’m scrolling through your feed for kicks, and it’s positively full of lovely links to things about porn, sodomization (per the link above), and I’ve seen the word “penis” over and over.

    Yep. Your customer(s?) must be wondering why they should hire a guy who’s interested in something as sick as an infant being sexually attacked by a dog.

    Comment by Rory — October 29th, 2007 @ 1:49 am
  17. Holy crap - I’m continuing through your links, and it’s like every tenth link has something to do with something obscene. You’re positively obsessed. Whether it’s infants being sodomized by dogs or whatever… just… wow.

    I also wonder what your customer(s?) would think if they went out to SiteSpaces and saw that you fund your project with links to porn and have pornographic imagery on the site (by way of the ads).

    Like I said… wow. I’m in a cafe right now, and I’m worried that someone’s going to see what’s on my screen - your links, the images you allow…

    Still working on the other comment. If you find any more posts about infants being sodomized by dogs, I’m sure you’ll post them.

    Comment by Rory — October 29th, 2007 @ 1:57 am
  18. “I wonder how you’d explain to your customers what you were doing posting a link to SiteSpaces to a story about “an infant” getting “sodomized” by a dog:”

    It was in my Google feed reader and I thought it was interesting so I posted it. It’s a news story. Get over it.

    “I also wonder what your customer(s?) would think if they went out to SiteSpaces and saw that you fund your project with links to porn and have pornographic imagery on the site (by way of the ads).”

    People on social networking sites don’t click on regular Google adsense ads. They just don’t. AdultFriendFinder.com is not a porn site. It is a site where adults can sign up and find a friend to have sex with. SiteSpaces.net is FOR ADULTS. Since switching to Adult Friend Finder I have monetized the website.

    I am PROUD to be an affiliate of AFF and I am also a member. I also have talked to the management and some of the programming staff. They are a multimillion dollar a year revenue company and an important force on the internet.

    I make no excuses for that. I also make no excuses for posting news stories.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 29th, 2007 @ 8:49 am
  19. And besides, I think Rory rocks, and I also think you’re lame.

    But Chris, I think I like you a bit as well: You get Rory to write more :)

    Comment by Yuvi — October 29th, 2007 @ 9:24 am
  20. Yuvi, why thank you fan of Rory’s blog that came here via a pingback. Tell your other friends to add my blog to their RSS as well.

    You can post this url right into your Google Feed Reader
    http://www.beercosoftware.com/blog/feed/

    I update a lot so don’t forget to check it every single day.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 29th, 2007 @ 10:21 am
  21. and “be sure to drink your Ovaltine”.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 29th, 2007 @ 10:22 am
  22. I hate ovaltine. With a passion greater than anything that has ever set anything anywhere. Though I’ve never tasted it.

    Comment by Yuvi — October 29th, 2007 @ 10:56 am
  23. “It was in my Google feed reader and I thought it was interesting so I posted it. It’s a news story. Get over it.”

    That’s my point. You thought it was interesting. That means you’re someone who’s interested in stories about infants getting “sexually sodomized” by dogs.

    I don’t to make you uncomfortable. If you’re into infants getting sodomized by dogs, then that’s obviously your thing. But you’re the one who’s been suggesting that my employer should have been concerned about a satirical posting of mine.

    Where my resume was a joke, you actually *are* interested in infants being sodomized by dogs. I just want to return the favor - you did your best to alert MS to my nefarious ways, and I want your clients to know that you’re a guy who’s into infants being raped in the ass by dangerous animals. That really is all kinds of fucked up.

    “People on social networking sites don’t click on regular Google adsense ads.”

    So that makes it somehow OK to plaster your site with pornographic ads? Hey - do what you have to to make money - I’m sure you need it. But, don’t call my content into question (”Perhaps you should be more worried about mentioning a meth addiction in your resume?”) when:

    1. My content was clearly satirical. You’re the first person I’ve encountered who didn’t figure that out. The resume’s a joke.

    2. Your site clearly *isn’t* satirical. You really are advertising with all these naughty little photos. Granted, SiteSpaces is a joke, but it isn’t the *funny* kind of joke.

    I just love it that, where I was putting something out for the amusement of others - a personal endeavor that was just for fun - you justify lining your site with T and A and justify it by saying that it makes you money.

    Awesome.

    “I am PROUD to be an affiliate of AFF and I am also a member. I also have talked to the management and some of the programming staff. They are a multimillion dollar a year revenue company and an important force on the internet.”

    Again, your sense of propriety seems to be money-driven. What *won’t* you do (or try to do, since you never succeed) for a dollar?

    You also have this pathetic habit of thinking that you’re somehow involved with [insert company or professional here] because you’ve communicated with them and spammed them with offers for them to join your army (hey - add another soldier, and your army will be twice as big!).

    You’ve communicated with just about every major player on the web in the industry, and they want *nothing* to do with you. If you think I’m going to see you any differently because you’ve pestered yet another group with your stupid schemes and empty threats (once they decline to work with you), then… well, nothing changes, as I already think you’re an asshat.

    *They* are a multimillion dollar company - not *you*. Referring to them in a sentence, or being their patsy (you post their ads), does not make *you* one of *them*.

    “I make no excuses for that.”

    And I make no excuses for referring to a meth stand in a joke. The difference here is that I don’t *need* to make an excuse. I’m not the one who started in by questioning another’s reputation by pointing out content they’ve produced that you deem somehow wrong.

    The fact is, the stuff I do is for entertainment. Everybody - except you, apparently - knows that. No other person in the world, unless we’re talking about someone with brain damage who was raised by wolves and doesn’t speak a single human language - would have taken my “naked ladies” post for anything other than light entertainment.

    Yet, here you are - after having called an innocent post like that into question, you’re taking pride in the fact that, for all you know, you’re *advertising* for a place in France where the naked ladies dance. And *you* had the nerve to judge *me*.

    Get some perspective. Like, *any* amount. Anything at all would be better than zero.

    “I also make no excuses for posting news stories.”

    Yeah, and that’s the problem. Your fascination with infants sodomized by dogs is something that is strongly deserving - I’ll stop short of “requires” - an excuse.

    You’re messed up.

    Comment by Rory — October 29th, 2007 @ 6:16 pm
  24. Chris -

    “Yuvi, why thank you fan of Rory’s blog that came here via a pingback. Tell your other friends to add my blog to their RSS as well.”

    Yeah. Your little plan worked. Yuvi came over to tell you that you’re lame.

    Enjoy your new customer!

    Frankly, I’m happy to see Yuvi here. While we don’t exactly know each other, we certainly know *of* each other (we haven’t met, but I’ve read enough of his stuff, and he’s read enough of my stuff that we may as well have), and I think we hold each other in high enough esteem that we can derive some sense of unity and comfort in approaching the problem of you together.

    It also gets another set of eyes on this comment thread. I hope *more* of my readers head over here so that they learn that Chris Rondat posts links to news stories about infants being sodomized by dogs. The more that gets around, the better. That one link sums up so much of what’s wrong with you.

    Comment by Rory — October 29th, 2007 @ 6:21 pm
  25. “That’s my point. You thought it was interesting. ”

    There’s a difference in being interested in the shock value of a passing news story and being interested in it pedagogically. I thought it was shocking so I linked it quickly.

    “So that makes it somehow OK to plaster your site with pornographic ads? Hey - do what you have to to make money -”

    They are not pornography. They are adds for AFF, a network of websites that allow adults to find partners to have sex with.
    And yes, money talks and bullshit walks.
    Kind of the way you walked out of Microsoft on your last day.
    I speculate that your coworkers cheered you out, hiding their gleeful anticipation until the door was closed fully behind you. That’s only an opinion and or educated guess though.

    “What *won’t* you do (or try to do, since you never succeed) for a dollar?”

    It’s BeerCo Corp as in Corporation. Our only goal is to make money for investors. That is what we do. Money talks, bullshit walks.

    “Frankly, I’m happy to see Yuvi here. While we don’t exactly know each other,”

    Yuvi’s a kid Rory, and you just filled his reading material with stuff about dog sodomy and porn. Congratulations.

    Your ex-corporation in Redmond exploits people in 3rd worlds working them like slaves. Most big corporations do. I’ll take AFF and dating over that any day. You can try to push a twisted perception onto me, but Microsoft reeks of it without any PR. And I don’t even need to try to twist people’s feelings about you. Jesus, enough with the dog sodomy talk already.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 29th, 2007 @ 8:06 pm
  26. If you’re going to talk about sodomy and children ANY MORE Rory, I am going to have to kick you off my blog.

    That’s just rude. The way you defended yourself against what you seem to think is some sort of attack is pitiful. Is that what Microsoft trains people to do?
    At any rate, if you don’t have anything non-disgusting to say, please go away.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 29th, 2007 @ 8:15 pm
  27. If any softies are reading through lurking, don’t even think of giving me that “he doesn’t know any better” shit. You know damn well.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 29th, 2007 @ 8:39 pm
  28. “You’ve communicated with just about every major player on the web in the industry, and they want *nothing* to do with you.”

    Um, actually, like I said I was a member. I submitted a bug report/patch to their internal bugzilla via a programmer at the company which patched a vulnerability that let anyone use auth info via a url to view another person’s account. I noticed it when I shared a link to a page while I was logged into AFF, and my friend was then able to access the control panel of my account. Without logging in or having my username or password.

    The programmer at Medley, the parent company of AFF confirmed the bug, gave me the bugzilla id and info and thanked me. The other stuff we talked about with their rep is still ongoing so I will not comment on that.

    You have no idea what you’re talking about. You were the only person that ever asked me to draw up a formal contract, then come back and say you lied about it. That doesn’t happen very often. I thought your reputation as a Microsoft PR person was good, but apparently it now speaks for itself. Microsoft did something similar with Baystar capital.
    http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=06/10/08/1714234
    “Microsoft assured me that it would in some way guarantee BayStar’s investment in SCO.’ Despite the denials about their involvement, Microsoft helped SCO continue this charade — and on top of that halted all contact with Baystar after the investment, reneging on their guarantee.”

    Microsoft has a long history of Indian giver trading, pun intended, and I think that your actions were no different being an MS employee for their public relations. Perhaps they train people to do this? I don’t know and I don’t want to.

    Comment by Chris — October 30th, 2007 @ 10:28 am
  29. Y’know chris, you could perhaps make more money off finding quotes about Microsoft off the internet, though you’d obviously have to use Google for this…

    Yeah, bragging rights for spotting a bug. Go on dude. I am pretty sure that Rory (or heck, *I*) have probably *fixed* more bugs than you’ve found (unless I’m very wrong (can I see a few examples of code *you* have written?(visibly? (or in action?))).

    I mean, yeah, you have a search engine that people will be flocking to use because it’s sooo good, but can I see some code? Any code? Some action rather than just words?

    Comment by Yuvi — October 30th, 2007 @ 11:28 am
  30. We mostly write code for enterprise frameworks, but I will be releasing the sources to Dark Energy soon, a GPL open framework for vector based widgets. It will be located at darkenergy.beercosoftware.com in about 2 weeks.

    http://sourceforge.net/projects/gcompmgr/
    I wrote this, and phpmail, and sitespaces software. Those were just PHP though. I also wrote a MSN/AIM windows client and gui creator, and an IRC client/server from scratch for Majestic Inc. like years ago.
    http://www.worldwidecreations.com/world_wide_instant_messenger
    I also worked on a Sun Looking glass incubator project way back when.
    https://lg3d.dev.java.net/jca-approved.html

    These projects are very old, because I can’t release the Enterprise code I worked on for obvious reasons. I also coded the framework bash scripts on Deity Linux. Basically, I coded a hell of a lot, and now I am coding a full search engine.

    I will not release the source code to that. Rory is not a coder, so I don’t see how you can compare him to me?
    I don’t want to argue too much with your being a kid and all. Good luck with your article.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 30th, 2007 @ 11:36 am
  31. Chris, I was going to tell the MILLIONS of my friends to add you to their feed reader, but then noticed that you had only one post about Rory. Just ONE FRIGGIN POST. So, post more about Rory, and I’ll recommend your feed, m’kay?

    Comment by Yuvi — October 30th, 2007 @ 11:37 am
  32. “So, post more about Rory, and I’ll recommend your feed, m’kay?”

    I’d say this post is more about Microsoft than Rory. Rory isn’t very important in the grand scheme of things. If I see enough hits from India on Google Analytics, and if you bring enough friends here, maybe, just maybe I may post about Rory and his writing career in the future. Maybe. We’ll see if enough people come.

    Right now all the hits are from Redmond, San Fran, the UK and Canada, in that order, so we’ll see. Do a good job and I’ll keep my end.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 30th, 2007 @ 11:41 am
  33. That’s perhaps my point. My friends aren’t *that* much interested in Microsoft (they are, after all, normal people, not geeks). They are, however, interested in Rory. So, any visit here would be strictly for Rory. Less Rory = Less Visits.

    You still perplex me. I really thought you were a stereotype troll, but you don’t quite fit into the stereotype. An “about me” post, perhaps?

    Comment by Yuvi — October 30th, 2007 @ 1:13 pm
  34. “That’s perhaps my point. My friends aren’t *that* much interested in Microsoft ”

    http://www.beercosoftware.com/blog/2007/10/30/what-would-you-like-to-see-on-this-blog/

    Comment by admin — October 30th, 2007 @ 1:21 pm
  35. “You have no idea what you’re talking about. You were the only person that ever asked me to draw up a formal contract, then come back and say you lied about it.”

    Actually, you offered. And, I never told you to involve your lawyer - what you were upset about was that you had to pay your lawyer to write the contract. That’s not my problem at all.

    If you feel so strongly about it, then why didn’t you follow through on the court case?

    Comment by Rory — October 31st, 2007 @ 5:08 pm
  36. “That doesn’t happen very often. I thought your reputation as a Microsoft PR person was good, but apparently it now speaks for itself.”

    PR hated me.

    As for my reputation - you’ve been mentioning it more and more.

    I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt here and assume that, by my reputation speaking for itself, there are a few really good reasons I still get job offers despite all I’ve gone through this past year, and all to which I’ve admitted having done (in my personal life, that is - nothing to do with Microsoft).

    Comment by Rory — October 31st, 2007 @ 5:11 pm
  37. “Rory is not a coder, so I don’t see how you can compare him to me?”

    Wow. More libel.

    You might ask yourself, then, why I’ve been coding lately, and also why I continue to get job offers to run off and start coding again.

    My interests lately have been Python, Inform, and Objective-C + Cocoa.

    I’m also involved in a rather large dialogue with one of the most well known companies in tech (not Microsoft, if that helps) about their dev tools. I can’t tell you *what* company it is, nor can I share any specifics of the conversation. However, it’s about coding - nothing at all to do with my work as a tech enthusiast.

    I still code.

    You’re wrong again.

    Comment by Rory — October 31st, 2007 @ 5:23 pm
  38. “I’d say this post is more about Microsoft than Rory.”

    My name’s in the title. It’s in the post. It might be more about MS, but you chose to use me as an example for whatever your argument(?) is.

    “Rory isn’t very important in the grand scheme of things.”

    My name’s in the title. It’s in the post.

    “If I see enough hits from India on Google Analytics, and if you bring enough friends here, maybe, just maybe I may post about Rory and his writing career in the future. Maybe. We’ll see if enough people come.”

    Is that incentive?

    “Right now all the hits are from Redmond, San Fran, the UK and Canada, in that order, so we’ll see.”

    How many hits?

    “Do a good job and I’ll keep my end.”

    Good luck, Yuvi. The fate of the universe hangs in the balance.

    Comment by Rory — October 31st, 2007 @ 5:28 pm
  39. “Yuvi’s a kid Rory, and you just filled his reading material with stuff about dog sodomy and porn. Congratulations.”

    It wasn’t my idea to talk about you in the third person, Yuvi. I know you you’re much more than able to speak your own mind. For some context, Chris is referring to a link he posted to another site of his called SiteSpaces.net - I would suggest you avoid it just because it’s highly offensive.

    Comment by Rory — October 31st, 2007 @ 5:30 pm
  40. Rory, I never saw you write code or post examples or sources at your job at MS. You acted as a company spokesperson as far as I can tell. I am a programmer. Also, please don’t tie up our phone lines unless you have business with our company, and please note that our business hours are until 5PM EST when we leave. If you can’t respect these hours and guidelines, we will have to block you via our telephony system. Please restrict comments about yourself to this thread. You may still post on other articles as does everyone, but must stay on topic like every one else. You may still call us, but only if you have business to do with our company.

    Comment by Chris R. — October 31st, 2007 @ 6:15 pm
  41. You are the president of BeerCo Software, yet you say you’re a coder.

    I was an evangelist, but I continue to code. I began coding in 1984. I’ve taken breaks along the way to do other things, but I’ve always picked it up again. Right now, I’m getting up to speed on changes to Objective-C now that it’s at v2.0. It finally got GC, which is quite nice. I find reference counting an elegant way to go about manual memory management, but it’s 2007, and it just doesn’t feel very modern to have to continue coding as though we were right back on next (that’s where Cocoa originated, hence the NS - for openstep, framework classes begin with OS).

    That’s not the only change by any means, and XCode and Interface Builder have been revamped as well.

    All nice, but still lacking. Although I found OS X’s Java implementation to be the finest I’ve encountered in terms of client UI performance and native-look (perf better than the improvement we saw when Java 14 made it to linux, bringing the OS the first highly performant version of what was a great tool for avoiding any unnecessarily low-level languages), the Java Cocoa bindings have always been dodgy and have suffered from ambiguity (though not as bad as chilisoft’s *nix implementation of ASP with its OJO-ActiveX bridge where we were once again plagued with the everything’s a variant vbscript problem).

    Java seemed like a good solution for easily creating apps for OS X, but it has fallen out of favor because of the aforementioned issues.

    RealBasic is a decent alternative to dealing with ObjectiveC and Cocoa, but it feels like a poor man’s version of VB6 - with that same mucky combination of a very basic OO model and the sloppy remnants of basic’s procedural past.

    On the plus side, it generates binaries for windows, linux, and OS X, and it does so without requiring any code changes. It actually accomplishes the write-once-run-anywhere ambition behind Java, though I still prefer Java as a language.

    There are also Cocoa bindings for Python, but they’re poorly documented. I plan, however, to delve into the bits to see what’s going on. Also cool, while talking Python, is ActiveState’s free Komodo Edit IDE. It’s bare-bones, but for free, it’s quite polished.

    I think Python is the ideal candidate for a higher level language to be supported officially by Apple. I’d rather see Apple take Python as an example of a beautiful and functional language, but redo it in such a way that the warts of Python are removed, some things are cleaned up, the dynamic typing is made optional (I don’t care for dynamic typing), and a subset of Cocoa is made available, but with a GUI toolkit that’s oriented toward a flatter model than MVC. MVC is great if you’re developing a large app that requires that level of abstraction, but you can get by much easier without it for smaller apps.

    I see it as being somewhat similar to the many inspirations that went into Java. Where syntax is concerned, I think it’d behoove Apple to take a strong look at Python, just as Java is clearly inspired by C and various outgrowths.

    So, yeah. I’m a coder. I see how you could have made the mistake, as it’s true that I didn’t talk about my own coding while I was at 9, but I had to keep my skills current since I spent my first two years at MS teaching thousands of people all over the country how to code more effectively with MS dev tools.

    I trust you’ll take this as decent evidence that I code. It’s not proof, of course, but the knowledge is there, and some of my efforts *are* out there if you know where to find them. I also keep an archive of work I’ve done professionally and for myself.

    I withdraw my comment about libel, as I really do see, based on how little I’ve talked about it for a year, why you might have thought I didn’t code.

    Comment by Rory — November 1st, 2007 @ 7:40 am
  42. Typo - that should read: Java 1.4 - not: Java 14.

    An important distinction since the latter obviously doesn’t exist.

    If there are other typos, I’ll leave ‘em. I wrote that comment (this one as well) on my phone while lying in bed. It’s a relaxing way to end the night, but very error-prone.

    Now, I’m off to browse elsewher until I fall asleep.

    Good evening. Or morrning. Or whatever it is for you.

    Comment by Rory — November 1st, 2007 @ 7:50 am
  43. Almost forgot…

    “Also, please don’t tie up our phone lines unless you have business with our company”

    Uh, yeah… so, there are a few options you have in dealing with unwanted phone calls, and if you don’t take advantage of one, then your phone line isn’t being tied up:

    1. You can tell the caller that you don’t have time to talk, say goodbye, and then hang-up.

    2. Hang-up without warning if you realize it’s someone you don’t want to talk to. You’re perfectly within your rights to do this.

    Those are two I thought of all on my own. See what *you* can come up with. Impress me.

    “…and please note that our business hours are until 5PM EST when we leave. ”

    Yeah. I’ve got a few things to say about that as well:

    1. I called you at 4:38 PM (your time, if we weren’t clear on that).

    2. The duration of the call was 00:20:46 (hh:mm:ss).

    Do the math. I called before 5:00, and the call was over before 5:00.

    And, like before, you have some free will here. You don’t have to answer the phone. If it’s past five - which wasn’t the case here, but I want to be clear - just don’t answer if you don’t have time.

    If 5:00 is approaching and you want to get off the phone, then just tell the person that 5:00 is approaching and you want to get off the phone.

    You were in no way tied to that call, and you had more than enough time to have told me that you didn’t want to talk. And, unless you’re under the control of my hypnotic powers, you could have walked away at any time.

    So, don’t go whining about a phone call. And if it really did tie up all of BeerCo’s telephonic resources, I suggest you get a second line, or order call waiting.

    If you can’t respect these hours and guidelines, we will have to block you via our telephony system.”

    Comment by Rory — November 1st, 2007 @ 4:47 pm

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Chris R. works at BeerCoSoftware.com (title: President of Development and Sales). This is Chris's work blog.

Disclaimer: BCS will not let personal views of any employee, including Chris, regarding any software product, company, standards or otherwise get in the way of any company that hires it to provide a solution. Companies pay BCS and BCS provides solutions regardless of the views of any employee. That’s part of being professional, and BCS is a professional software company.

Everything here is Chris's personal opinion and is not read or approved before it is posted. No warranties or other guarantees will be offered as to the quality of the opinions or anything else on this blog.

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